The 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English. 30 November to 3 December 2019
The 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English. 30 November to 3 December 2019
The 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English. 30 November to 3 December 2019

Larissa Behrendt is a keynote presenter at the 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of EnglishDistinguished Prof. Larissa Behrendt is a Eualayai/Gamillaroi woman and the Director of Research and Academic Programs at the Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning at the University of Technology, Sydney.

She is a graduate of the UNSW Law School and has a Masters and SJD from Harvard Law School. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and a founding member of the Australian Academy of Law. Larissa won the 2018 Australian Directors Guild Award for best Direction of a Documentary Film for After the Apology. She also wrote and directed the Walkley nominated documentary, Innocence Betrayed.

She has written and produced several short films. She is a graduate of UNSW and Harvard Law School. She has published numerous textbooks on Indigenous legal issues. Larissa won the 2002 David Uniapon Award and a 2005 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for her novel Home.

Her second novel, Legacy, won a Victorian Premiers Literary Award. She is also the author of Indigenous Australia for Dummies. Her most recent book is Finding Eliza: Power and Colonial Storytelling (2016, UQP). She is a board member of the Sydney Festival and a member of the Major Performing Arts Panel of the Australia Council.

Larissa was awarded the 2009 NAIDOC Person of the Year award and 2011 NSW Australian of the Year. She is the host of Speaking Out on ABC Radio.

Maxine Beneba Clarke is a keynote presenter at the 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of EnglishMaxine Beneba Clarke is the author of the ABIA and Indie award winning short fiction collection Foreign Soil, the critically acclaimed memoir The Hate Race, and the poetry collection Carrying the World, which won the 2017 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for poetry.

She is also the co-editor of the 2019 publication, Growing Up African in Australia. Her children's picture books include the CBCA winning The Patchwork Bike, and Fashionista, a meditation on self expression. She is currently Poet Laureate for The Saturday Paper.

 

 

Anne Whitney is a keynote presenter at the 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English

Anne Elrod Whitney is Professor of Education at the Pennsylvania State University (USA).

A former secondary school English teacher and university writing instructor, Anne studies writing as a way of learning and living, as well as the teaching of writing and the development of teachers.  

Her published work includes Coaching Teacher-Writers (co-authored with Troy Hicks, Jim Fredricksen, and Leah Zuidema) and Teaching Writers to Reflect (co-authored with Colleen McCracken and Deana Washell).

 

 

John Yandell is a keynote presenter at the 2019 AATE National Conference, 'My story flows in more than one direction: power of story, politics of voice', organised by VATE - the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English

John Yandell taught in inner London secondary schools for twenty years before moving to the Institute of Education, University College London, where he has worked since 2003.

As a teacher and a teacher educator, he has written extensively on policy and pedagogy, curriculum and assessment, particularly in relation to English as a school subject. He has a longstanding interest in school students as active and collaborative makers of meaning, and a commitment to investigating and representing classrooms as complex sites of cultural production.

He is the editor of the journal, Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education and the author of The Social Construction of Meaning: reading literature in urban English classrooms (Routledge, 2013). Other recent publications include Rethinking Education: whose knowledge is it anyway? (with Adam Unwin, New Internationalist, 2016), and Critical Practice in Teacher Education: a study of professional learning, which he co-edited with Ruth Heilbronn. 

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